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Teachers of Grades K-12 Spend $475 of Their Own Money on Classroom Materials and Supplies Each Year

According to LiteracyNews.com, Teachers of grades K-12 spend on average $475 of their own money on classroom materials and supplies annually, with elementary school teachers spending a significantly higher amount ($539) compared to middle ($393) and high ($427) school teachers. These and other key findings can be found in a new report, Teacher Buying Behavior 2006-2007, from Quality Education Data, Inc.

QED’s Teacher Buyer Behavior also asked educators about the types of materials they need the most for their classrooms. Thirty-eight percent of all teachers report needing materials that support differentiated instruction; middle school teachers (45%) are significantly more likely to report needing these types of materials compared to elementary (37%) and high (32%) school teachers. Elementary school teachers (19%) are significantly more likely to report needing non-fiction trade for their classroom compared to middle (8%) and high (9%) school teachers.

  • Rocking the Boat

    501(c)(3) charity
    Bronx, NY
    Serving roughly 75 boys and girls (high school)
    Magazines Requested: Wooden Boat magazine, Fine Woodworking, Sail, National Geographic

  • Bright Minds Nursery: Pre & Kindergarten School

    School or Library
    Lucea, Hanover, Jamaica
    Serving 48 females (ages 2-6yrs) and 35 males (ages 2-6 yrs)
    Magazines Requested: Letters, Numbers, Colors, Shapes, Spanish/ English, Mathematics etc..

  • Mile High Youth Corps

    501(c)(3) charity
    Education
    Needs: 30 to 100 magazines
    Magazines Requested:
    For Corps members to read to their children: -Kids -Kids Discover -Sports Illustrated Kids -Humpty Dumpty -Hop scotch for Girls -Chick-a-dee -Highlights -Hello -Turtle -Yum for Kids.
    For Corps members to read on their own: -Readers Digest -National Geographic -Sports Illustrated -Make -Men’s Health -Ebony -Kiplinger -Self -O -The New Yorker -Wired

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